From left to right: Forough Momayyez, Zohre Shahriari, Seyyedh Maryam Kharrazi, Mojtaba Jokar, Sajjad Karimi, Abolfazl Lotfi Aski

2018-03-07 10:58

Internationalisation enriches the research environment

The Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery (SCRR) is a research environment within the resource recovery field at the University of Borås, where they focus on improving and developing new methods for material recovery and waste processing.

SCRR takes an active approach to internationalisation and frequently welcomes visiting doctoral students from around the world.

“An exchange that involves doctoral students from international higher education institutions makes a vital contribution to our research. It enables us to access new knowledge and gives us an opportunity to promote our own research environment, the university, and Sweden.” says Mohammad Taherzadeh, professor in resource recovery.

Higher education institutions around the world are familiar with the research within resource recovery conducted at the University of Borås, and doctoral students take it upon themselves to apply for a chance to be a part of our research projects. The university has so far welcomed doctoral students from, among other countries, Malaysia, Indonesia, China, Algeria, Uzbekistan, Iran, Nigeria, Germany, Poland and Italy.

“We get a great many enquiries about taking on visiting doctoral students. Unfortunately, we can’t accept everyone. Offers tend to be made based on the research subject, what qualifications we are able to offer, and whether or not we have the equipment that the doctoral student may need.”

Mutual cooperation

Funding also plays an important part and is the determining factor in how long a doctoral student can remain at the university.

“Once a doctoral student has received a letter of acceptance confirming that we have a place available, he or she then has to apply for funding. How long students stay here varies considerably; we’ve had students here for periods of time varying from one month to two years.”

A great deal of effort goes into promoting exchanges within the field of resource recovery, because they provide access to a wealth of experience, while also encouraging social cohesion. The doctoral students become both colleagues and friends during their time at the university.

“There is mutual cooperation, enabling both the higher education institutions involved to promote themselves. Not only does our level of knowledge increase, but the student acquires knowledge that he or she can then take back to their own institution. The visiting doctoral student is an important ambassador for us.”

During the autumn SCRR welcomed six new visiting doctoral students. Three of these students, Sajjad Karimi, Zohre Shahryari and Seyyedeh Maryam Kharrazi, are conducting research into fungi and fish nutrition. Mojtaba Jokar, Forough Momayyez and Moein Lotfi are conducting research projects focusing on biogas.

“The university has several well-equipped laboratories and professors with expert knowledge who can help me develop my project and my thesis within the field of environmental pollution,” says Seyyedeh Maryam Kharrazi from Isfahan University of Technology.

Text: Annie Klasén
Foto: Erika Danielsson