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Previous Research seminars

SPRING 2016 - Programme

 

January 11

 No seminar scheduled.

January 18

Following tweets around. Developing methods for understanding the Swedish political Twitterverse.

David Gunnarsson Lorentzen
External commentator: Anders Olof Larsson, Department of Media and Communication, University of Oslo.

David Gunnarsson Lorentzen is a PhD student of the Social Media Studies group at Swedish School of Library and Information Science. His main research interests are webometrics, method development, and Twitter research. This is his final seminar.

NOTE! The seminar starts at 13:00 and is ongoing until 15:00!

January 25 

No seminar scheduled.

February 1

No seminar scheduled.

February 8

Performing the school librarian: using Butler and performativity on school librarian practices and identities. 

Ulrika Centerwall

The paper presents a small scale study on how school librarians reflect on their work and profession. Empirical data from fourteen semi-structured qualitative interviews with school librarians at award-winning Swedish secondary and upper secondary school libraries have been used. This is analyzed in relation to the concept of performativity and performative resignification.

Ulrika Centerwall is a PhD student at The Swedish School of Library and Information Science and a member of The Linnaeus Centre for Research on Learning, Interaction and Mediated Communication in Contemporary Society (LinCS). 

February 15

 No seminar scheduled.

February 22

Past, present and future of our discipline of LIS.


“Building a discipline at the intersection between academia and professional practice"

This presentation  will provide a study of the history of the discipline of LIS as it evolved in Sweden with short glimpses of international comparisons. A text in Swedish can be found at http://hb.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:859272/FULLTEXT01.pdf

February 29

Sociocultural approaches to credibility assessments of everyday life information: A Facebook group of mothers 

Ameera Mansour

Ameera Mansour is PhD student at The Swedish School of Library and Information Science and a member of The Linnaeus Centre for Research on Learning, Interaction and Mediated Communication in Contemporary Society (LinCS). This is an article seminar.

March 7

Past, present and future of our discipline of LIS.

“SSLIS within LIS: the next 10 years”.

Future prospects and plans for our discipline is the topic for discussion at this seminar. Introductions will be given by representatives from our four research groups.

March 14 

No seminar scheduled.

March 21

(The seminar is postponed to april 4)

Critical transmission activities: Memory institutions and digital editing 

Merisa Martinez

In this research seminar, I will discuss plans for a thesis by publication. Topics of my proposed articles will cover broad themes, including the relationship between Library and Information Science and the Digital Humanities; issues of copyright and licensing digital data in the EU and the UK; facilitating the reuse of digital data from digital projects; rethinking modes of dissemination of digital data to diverse user groups; and mapping the political landscape of cultural heritage digitization in Scandinavia.

Merisa about Merisa: I am a PhD candidate at the Swedish School of Library and Information Science, University of Borås. Before coming to Borås, I worked and studied at the postgraduate level in the United States, France, and Scotland. During my PhD, I have been a Visiting Researcher at the Cambridge University Digital Library and a Visiting Student at the Department of History and Philosophy of Science, Cambridge University. I am a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Early Stage Research Fellow in the Digital Scholary Editions (DiXiT) Initial Training Network. The research conducted during my PhD is funded by this fellowship, a Marie Curie action which is part of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme for Research (FP7).

March 28

Easter Monday - no seminar!

April 4

Breathing life into a standard: the configuration of resuscitation in practices of informing

Karolina Lindh

Karolina Lindh, PhD, Lund University, will present her recently defended doctoral thesis.

Abstract
The study inquires into how a specific piece of standardised information, namely the standard for bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), is configured in the practices of lifesaving and bystander CPR-training. Standardisation is commonly thought of as leading to uniformity and order, while practices are dynamic. They evolve and change through repeated enactments. The aim of this thesis is to explore what happens in the meeting of these two apparently conflicting phenomena, practices and standards. The study's analytical framework is primarily based on theories of practice, previous studies of standards and a foucauldian governmentality perspective. In order to attain the aim the CPR standard is followed ethnographically and a few specific incidents of its enactment are examined in detail. The material the study is based on has been compiled by observing bystander CPR classes, interviews with participants in CPR training and documents from some of the central actors involved in this practice which develop, update and distribute guidelines. The study demonstrates how the standard in the pursuits of making CPR an intervention to be carried out by the lay public is linked to and associated with technologies, hopes and aspirations. As these diverse elements are connected to each other, additional configurations of lifesaving and resuscitation than that delineated by the standard appear. The ways in which information features and informing happens in these pursuits are diverse and shown to have implications for the shaping of a particular kind of subjects, lay rescuers. This study consequently raises questions about how standardised information is configured in practices and how diverse ways in which informing happens in practice are associated with different forms of governance.

The thesis in full text: http://lup.lub.lu.se/record/7791653

Critical transmission activities: Memory institutions and digital editing 

Merisa Martinez

10:00
D 519 

In this research seminar, I will discuss plans for a thesis by publication. Topics of my proposed articles will cover broad themes, including the relationship between Library and Information Science and the Digital Humanities; issues of copyright and licensing digital data in the EU and the UK; facilitating the reuse of digital data from digital projects; rethinking modes of dissemination of digital data to diverse user groups; and mapping the political landscape of cultural heritage digitization in Scandinavia.

Merisa about Merisa: I am a PhD candidate at the Swedish School of Library and Information Science, University of Borås. Before coming to Borås, I worked and studied at the postgraduate level in the United States, France, and Scotland. During my PhD, I have been a Visiting Researcher at the Cambridge University Digital Library and a Visiting Student at the Department of History and Philosophy of Science, Cambridge University. I am a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Early Stage Research Fellow in the Digital Scholary Editions (DiXiT) Initial Training Network. The research conducted during my PhD is funded by this fellowship, a Marie Curie action which is part of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme for Research (FP7).

April 11

No seminar scheduled.

April 18

Digital Scholarly Editing for the Genetic Orientation: The Making of a Genetic Digital Edition Samuel Beckett's Works

Wout Dillen

Wout Dillen is a postdoctoral researcher with a specialization in the field of Digital Scholarly Editing. His doctoral thesis was titled Digital Scholarly Editing for the Genetic Orientation: The Making of a Genetic Digital Edition Samuel Beckett's Works, which was part of the ERC Project 'Creative Undoing and Textual Scholarship (CUTS)' at the University of Antwerp, Belgium. For this project, he also developed an online Lexicon of Scholarly Editing (http://uahost.uantwerpen.be/lse). On April 1st 2016, he will start working at the Swedish School for Library and Information Science as part of the DiXiT project 'Digital Scholarly Editing and Memory Institutions', supervised by Mats Dahlström. This project calls for a critical assessment of digitization practices by exploring the range of measures and methods that are used for establishing the trustworthiness and authenticity of digital reproductions and archives. More specifically, it will investigate the way in which collaboration and negotiation processes between researchers, memory institutions, and third party industrial agents may affect the quality and authenticity of the digitized objects.

April 25

Key Roles and Competencies of  Information Professionals Working in the Local Studies Department of Thai Provincial University Libraries

Pussadee Nonthacumjane

Pussadee Nonthacumjane is a PhD student at The Swedish School of Library and Information Science (SSLIS). This is her thesis plan seminar.

May 2

No seminar scheduled.

Ph D symposium in Oslo 2-3 May 2016.

Tuesday May 10 at 16:00-17:30

Joint colloquium Borås - Berlin - Copenhagen

Presenter from SSLIS: David Gunnarsson Lorentzen
The seminar will be held in A 315

May 16

Judging merits in the age of the h-index:  The use of metrics in medicine and economics


Björn Hammarfelt

Judging merits in the age of the h-index: The use of metrics in medicine and economics

The number of publications has been a fundamental merit in the competition for academic positions since the late 18th century. Today, the simple counting of publications has been supplemented with a whole range of bibliometric measures, which supposedly not only measures the volume of research but also its impact. In this study, we investigate how metrics are used for evaluating the impact and quality of publications in two specific settings: medicine and economics. Our study exposes the extent and type of metrics used in the external evaluations of candidates for academic positions at Swedish universities. Moreover, we show how different bibliometric indicators, both explicitly and implicitly, are employed to value and rank candidates. Ultimately, our findings contribute to a further understanding of how a emerging ‘metric culture’ influences evaluation repertoires in specific fields.

This study is a part of the project Measuring science and it is conducted together with Alex Rushforth (PhD) from the EPIC working group at the Centre for Science and Technology Studies, Leiden University.

http://www.hb.se/en/Research/Projects/Measuring-science-The-use-of-metrics-in-assessing-impact-innovation-and-excellence-in-modern-academia-/

http://www.cwts.nl/research/working-groups/evaluation-practices-in-context

Björn Hammarfelt, PhD, is senior lecturer at The Swedish School of Library and Information Science (SSLIS) and visiting scholar at the Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS), Leiden University, Netherlands. This is an article seminar.

May 23

The most learned monarch in Europe 

Arvid Jakobsson

The Swedish king Oskar II (1829-1907) collected books all his life. His library is the focus of Arvid Jakobsson’s thesis. At the seminar Jakobsson will present a revised and extended version of the thesis plan.

Arvid Jakobsson is Acting Palace Librarian at the Royal Palace in Stockholm and Keeper of the Bernadotte Archive and PhD student at SSLIS. Arvid works part-time with the thesis about king Oskar II’s library.

The seminar will be held in Swedish.

May 30

Distribution of Swedish books in digital formats through commercial and public channels

Birgitta Wallin

The position of libraries and bookshops in the book distribution chain have changed since the arrival of e-books. It is now possible for authors and publishers to sell or lend e-books directly to readers for a small sum and by doing so skipping one step in the distribution chain. What changed strategies will suppliers of Swedish books adopt or envision in relation to changes introduced by the arrival of e-books?

Birgitta Wallin is a PhD student at The Swedish School of Library and Information Science (SSLIS). This is her mid seminar.

June 3

Maria Lindh, PhD student at SSLIS

Final seminar

External commentator: Karl Palmås

The seminar is held at 13:00 in C430

June 6

Swedish National Day - no seminar!

June 13

Resurrection of Karl Marx?

Anders Frenander

International interest in Karl Marx has lately risen considerably. Biographies and introductions to his life and work have been published in several languages. Why is that? Anders Frenander will give an introduction to his thoughts and asks if they are of any relevance for the 21st century. The seminar is open for everyone at A3 and offers an opportunity to discuss the influence and relevance of Marx in various research areas pertinent to our academy.

Please note that the seminar will be held in Swedish.

AUTUMN 2015 - Programme

The seminars will be held in room D 513

7 September 

Folkbibliotek i brytningstid

Anders Frenander, Professor at SSLIS

The paper, presented in the seminar, describes an important period for the development of Swedish public libraries, 1965-1974.

The seminar will be held in Swedish.

14 September 

Autoethnography as a qualitative research approach

Sheila Webber, Bill Johnston, Ola Pilerot

We will introduce autoethnography as a qualitative research approach and discuss some different interpretations of autoethnography. Bill Johnston will discuss the autoethnographic research he is currently engaged with, which focuses on taking a major political decision (voting on whether Scotland should be an independent nation: the Scottish Referendum 2014) and illuminating the implications for information literacy by applying the lens of autoethnographic research. For this session, he will be reflecting on the process entailed in autoethnography and the decisions he is facing e.g. on deciding a focus and a way of writing. Bill and Sheila Webber will also discuss her role as collaborator in his autoethnography. Sheila will then discuss her own autoethnographic journey, and her focus of interest, the 3D virtual world, Second Life. Sheila is currently using autoethnographic material as key evidence in an ongoing project using a practice theory approach, in which she is collaborating with Dr Ola Pilerot. This project aims to explore the enactment and development of professional practice of Sheila in her role as co-organiser of the Virtual worlds Education Roundtable, a weekly discussion forum that takes place in Second Life. The session will finish by Ola and Sheila outlining their approach to this research, including their mode of collaboration.

About Sheila

Sheila Webber is a Senior Lecturer in the Information School, University of Sheffield, UK. She is Director of the Centre for Information Literacy Research and Head of the Department’s Libraries and Information Society Research group. Sheila has been involved in numerous Information Literacy initiatives and associations and is currently a committee member of the IFLA Information Literacy Section. Sheila is an invited speaker on information literacy internationally, author of over 100 publications, and has maintained the Information Literacy Weblog since 2005 http://information-literacy.blogspot.com (which is approaching a million page views). Apart from information literacy, her specialisms include information behaviour in computer gaming, and use of technology (e.g. virtual worlds and MOOCs) in education.

About Bill

Bill Johnston is a retired Senior Lecturer in the Centre for Academic Practice and Learning Enhancement at the University of Strathclyde, Scotland, and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. He is currently an Honorary Research Fellow at the Centre for Lifelong Learning, University of Strathclyde. Bill has undertaken extensive research on curriculum development (including projects funded by the UK’s Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Quality Assurance Agency, and the Australian Learning and Teaching Council). Bill has been invited keynote speaker at international conferences on the first year experience of Higher Education, and on information literacy.

About Ola

Ola Pilerot, senior lecturer at the Swedish School of Library and Information Science (SSLIS), University of Borås, teaches and publishes within the field of information practices and information literacies. He is a member of the Linnaeus Centre for Research on Learning, Interaction and Mediated Communication in Contemporary Society (LinCS) at the University of Gothenburg and the University of Borås, and of the International Information Literacies Research Network (iilresearch). Pilerot is also regional editor (Western Europe) of the journal Information Research.

 The seminar will be held in English.

21 September 

No scheduled seminar.

28 September

Getting published: the article publication process

Tom Wilson, Senior Professor, University of Borås.

Tom is founder, publisher and Editor-in-Chief of the open access journal, Information Research, and previously founded and edited Social Science Information Studies and the International Journal of Information Management.  He thus brings to the question of how to get published a wide experience over more than 30 years of accepting, or rejecting, papers.

This is a lecture and discussion mainy for doctoral students.

The seminar will be held in English.

5 October 

Is self-publishing a salvation for authors? The case of Lithuanian printed bestseller in the digital environment.

This is a seminar in two parts. During the first part Arūnas Gudinavičius, lecturer and researcher in Vilnius University, Faculty of Communication (Institute of Book Science and Documentation and Media Research Laboratory), will present the study:
Is self-publishing a salvation for authors? The case of Lithuanian printed bestseller in the digital environment.
During the second part professor Elena Maceviciute, SSLIS,  and PhD Skans Kersti Nilsson, SSLIS, will present the reseach network COST Action E-READ, in which Arunas and Elena represent Lithania, and Kersti represents Sweden.
 
The seminar will be held in English.

 

12 October 

What is interest, and why is it interesting to information research?

Ric Glassey, PhD, KTH, Stockholm.

The emotion of interest serves as an important, intrinsic motivator to explore, encounter and experience stimuli in our environment. Increasingly, this has become an information-rich environment, yet little is known how the emotion of interest guides our choices on what seems interesting, useful or entertaining. Instead, we depend upon information systems driven by sophisticated ranking, filtering or recommendation algorithms that rely upon the opinions of many to determine what is important.

The first part of this presentation will outline the history of human interest and give the current understanding and predominant model of interest as an emotion that focuses on novelty/complexity response.  The question of 'how to detect interest' will also be answered by discussing the subjective and objective measures that have been used in previous studies.  Examples from both art and literature will be discussed to illustrate the methods of measuring interest as an emotional response mediated by novelty and complexity.

The second part of this presentation will share our initial steps in attempting to find and measure the interest response within information encountering environments (i.e. reading the news).  This work adopts the novelty-complexity response model of interest and attempts to show its presence using a subjective-self assessment by news reading participants as a measure of interest.  We conclude with the results of this study and outline next steps this work will take.

Richard Glassey is currently a lecturer at KTH, Stockholm.  His main interests concern the epistemological emotions and their influence on human information behaviour.  Previously he was part of the "PuppyIR" FP7 EU project that focused on building child-friendly information systems and was based at the University of Glasgow, Scotland.

The seminar will be held in English.

19 October

Web Communities, Immigration and Social Capital

Jasmina Maric PhD

Jasmina will present her PhD thesis which was defended at Tilburg University, Tilburg Centre for Cognition and Communication, Netherlands in November 2014. Her thesis investigates the use of web communities by immigrants in their acquisition of social capital. Current research in the field of human interaction on the web indicates that the web is not only changing how people communicate, it is also changing with whom they communicate. Therefore the thesis investigates two pathways of immigrant web communication: (1) bonding social capital web communities - i.e., investigating a group of immigrants on the web with the same origin background, and (2) bridging social capital web communities - i.e., investigating a group of immigrants on the web with the same country of residence.

The seminar will be held in English.

26 October 

The library as a performative space

Henrik Jochumsen, Associated Professor at Royal School of Library and Information Science at the University of Copenhagen.

In recent years we have witnessed a ‘performative turn’ in which cultural institutions such as theatres, museums and public libraries have increasingly embraced concepts such as user-participation, user-involvement, user-driven innovation and co-creation.  In the case of public libraries, performative spaces, where users are given the potential to be creative and innovative, are now being established in many public libraries. The aim of the seminar is to analyse and discuss the development of performative spaces in public libraries from a sociological as well as a cultural policy perspective.

Henrik Jochumsen holds a doctoral degree and has written several books and articles on development of public libraries. He has also participated as a consultant in connection with a number of library-projects and new library buildings.

The seminar will be held in Danish and Swedish.

2 November 

No scheduled seminar.

9 November 

No scheduled seminar.

16 November 

At 13:00 in room E 310 - VIVA

Lars Björk is defending his doctoral thesis.

Faculty opponent: Melissa Terras, Professor of digital humanities, the Department of Information Studies at University College London

23 November 

Thinking quality: Quality perspectives on literature in to different cultural environments.

Knut Oterholm, cand, philol., Assistant Professor at Department of Archivistics, Library and Information Science, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences.

This talk will discuss how professional readers in public libraries and the expert committee in The Norwegian Authors Union  articulate literary quality in terms of, values, aesthetics, and practice, dependent on their political and artistic mandate. The offset of the talk, is in my ongoing Phd-project: Quality in practice.

Knut Oterholm has published articles on the concepts of literary quality and mediation. Latest publication is Fornemmelse og oppmerksomhet - artikulasjon og stemme. Et kroppslig perspektiv på formidling.  From November 2013 he is a Ph.D. Candidate at Oslo and Akershus University College.

The seminar will be held in Norwegian and Swedish.

30 November 

No seminar scheduled.

7 December

To library the world - some thoughts on "library" in library and information science

Katarina Michnik and Catarina Eriksson, PhD students at SSLIS

A conceptaul model for the understanding of "library" in library and information science will be discussed. The intention is to broaden the understanding of "library" in LIS.

14 December 

No seminar scheduled

 

16 December  (wednesday)

The seminar will be held in room C430, 13.00-14.30

Vectors for fieldwork: Computational thinking and new modes of ethnography.

Anne Beaulieu, Ph D, Groenningen, Netherlands.

Ethnographic methods in the context of digital tools and networked relations have been adapted in fascinating ways. In this presentation, I will discuss how computationalisation as a framework (Hayles, 2012) shapes some of the adaptations of ethnographic methods. In particular, the relation to the ethnographic object, to other ethnographers and to the readers of ethnographic inquiry will be analysed. How is the idea that the universe is digital used to articulate notions of the field, of informants and of what it means to do fieldwork? How does a computational framework shape team ethnography and tools for ethnographic collaboration?

Dr Anne Beaulieu is programme manager of EnergySense, at University of Groningen for the Energy Academy Europe. She joined the University of Groningen following several years as senior research fellow at the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), where she also acted as deputy programme leader of the Virtual Knowledge Studio for the Humanities and Social Sciences between 2005 and 2010. A dominant theme in Beaulieu’s work is the importance of interfaces for the creation and circulation of knowledge. Past research projects at the KNAW in the area of e-science and e-research focused on data-sharing, on knowledge networks, and on visualisation and visual knowledge. Beaulieu has also done extensive work in the field of digital humanities, on new (ethnographic) research methods and on ethics in e-research. She also has a very successful track-record in conceiving and implementing novel, interactive forms of communication in research and teaching.

The seminar will be held in English.